Woven Into Each Other

Japanese kioke (lit. trans. wood oke) barrels are unique in that they are held together by bamboo hoops called taga. No glue, no nails. Just meters of bamboo that are intricately cut, angled, and woven to make sure that everything seamlessly maintains a circular shape. Over centuries of practicing, woven bamboo became the answer to the practical problem of creating salt-based seasonings in a humid climate. With metal, rust would creep into the fermented products. So how are these practices maintained today?

3.11 nine years later

On March 11, 2001 the eastern seaboard of Japan was hit with a triple whammy of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disaster. Its ill-effects still linger today. Nine years later, I reflect on the sewing cooperative of Minami Sanriku who remain resilient.